Any wine lover, wine maker and wine connoisseur worth their weight can tell you one of the largest problems with the South African wine industry is the total lack of local market interest. The current South African wine drinkers are predominately rugby moms who drink iced Chardonnay and while watching Jan play his Saturday morning match against Paarl or tragically basic, young teeny boppers who drink “rosé all day”. The rest of the population sticks to “branners and coke”, beer or ciders.

As a student I have found myself confined to the four Bs – Bartinney, Bramptons, Balboa and Bohos. Now the first three are what we need in South Africa if we want to encourage a new generation of informed, interested and adventurous wine drinkers. The latter – not so much. Robertson box wine  may be a successful product but I am a firm believer that wine should not be drunk from a juice carton and served with a beer glass of ice.

As it is, the only time the average student is exposed to a “Savvy B” instead of a “Sauvignon Plonk” is if they’ve ventured out to the surrounding wine farms, usually only for the pre-dance fashionable photos, because no one can afford the übers fees for a weekly wine tour. Luckily for wine students this occurs more often due to enthusiasm from all your class mates to go for a sneaky tasting after every minor accomplishment. Yay! We finished a prac report let’s go wine tasting. Yay! We attended all out classes today let’s go wine tasting.

Ironically, Stellenbosch as the wine capital of South Africa has a serious deficiency of wine-drinking platforms for students, particularly those who don’t confine their drinking times to 10am until 5pm as most wine farms do. University is the place of innovations, where trends are born and die and sadly, the trend of wine drinking starts and stops at “Tassies” and “Four cousins”, not to say these aren’t well-respected wines in their own right, but let’s be honest, any wine snob would be horrified to find themselves with a glass of tassies while unwinding after a horrible test.

I have been fortunate enough to travel many places within and outside of South Africa. The wine lists littered across the rest of South Africa are depressing and it’s no small wonder that wine is not the hot accessory we need it to be. In international metropolitan areas, like Barcelona and London wine is the answer to everything. Hot new wine bars open up more often than a cellar intern stress-cries during harvest (which in my case was at least once a day).  And this is where South Africa is seriously lagging behind. With so much to offer to the new untapped hipster, trend-setter consumers we seriously fall short.

Part of South African wine charm is the diversity (if you like clichés we could say rainbow nation of wine). We have historic Constantia wines to the reputable Stellenbosch powerhouses and now we also enjoy the yuppie, alternative Swartland surprises.

Wine is seen as snobbish and elusive by the majority of the population. But, that is something so easy to change. Bring out the screw caps, crown caps and orange wines to the young population. We’re all equally lost, alone and confused when it comes to the apricot-bomb Viogniers or orange Semillon. It’s the great equaliser that we’ve been waiting for and together students can become the pioneers in the alternative wine movement.  Once wine can be viewed as trendy and hip then the young adults will flood the market and perhaps we will have a local wine consumption to be proud of.

So why is it so difficult to get these wines to break into the new market of the young trend setters, ubiquitous across campuses? Why are there no wine bars populating every nook and cranny of South Africa’s CBDs? Bring on the hipster wine bars where Malbec comes in a mason jar and we get deconstructed Pinotage tastings.  Every youth with their  vintage clothing, vinyl records and “Rocking the Daisies” wristbands from 2017, 2016 and 2015 will show up to experience the alternative and innovative wines on offer.